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abi-global-health

Australia

Abi telehealth services and configurations available in Australia.

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Abi telehealth service options

· Text micro-consults.

· Medication Prescriptions.

· Specialist referrals.

· Video Consultations.

· Voice Consultations.

User onboarding options

· Outbound SMS.

· Outbound Email.

· Inbound (landing page, embed).

· Offline (QR code).

Abi user interfaces

· Chat Bot.

· Web App.

· Widget.

· Services APIs.

Top 3 Chats Apps

1. Messenger.

2. WhatsApp.

3. Skype.

easy-integration-abi

Abi telehealth service options

· Text micro-consults.

· Medication Prescriptions.

· Specialist referrals.

· Video Consultations.

· Voice Consultations.

User onboarding options

· Outbound SMS.

· Outbound Email.

· Inbound (landing page, embed).

· Offline (QR code).

Abi user interfaces

· Chat Bot.

· Web App.

· Widget.

· Services APIs.

Top 3 Chats Apps

1. Messenger.

2. WhatsApp.

3. Skype.

Abi Healthcare Professionals

· General Physicians.

· General Nurses.

· Specialist Nurses.

· Specialist Physicians.

Languages supported

· English.

Branding options

· Abi branded.

· Co-branded.

· White labelled.

Abi Healthcare Professionals

· General Physicians.

· General Nurses.

· Specialist Nurses.

· Specialist Physicians.

Languages supported

· English.

Branding options

· Abi branded.

· Co-branded.

· White labelled.

Regulatory information
for your market

Telehealth regulation

 

There are currently no laws or regulations specifically relating to telehealth in Australia. Existing laws and regulations relating to the provision healthcare apply to telehealth. However, various regulatory and industry bodies across the healthcare profession have released guidance notes on delivering services via telehealth.

For example, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (“AHPRA”), the federal body responsible for regulation of healthcare professionals in Australia has published on its website a telehealth guidance for practitioners (“AHPRA Guidance”). 

The AHPRA Guidance states that all registered health practitioners can use telehealth as long as it is safe and clinically appropriate for the health service being provided and suitable for the patient.

Source.

Privacy and Data Protection

 

Australian privacy and surveillance laws are generally applicable to the provision of telehealth services in Australia.

At the Federal level, the core privacy legislation is the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (“Privacy Act”) and the Australian Privacy Principles (“APPs”). State and territory legislation broadly aligns with the Federal framework. The Privacy Act regulates the collection, use and disclosure of personal information, defined as information or an opinion about an identified individual, or an individual who is reasonably identifiable, whether the information or opinion is true or not and whether recorded in a material form or not. All personal information collected in the course of providing a health service, including information or an opinion about the health of an individual and their wishes about the future provision of health, is considered health information under the Privacy Act. Health information is sensitive information, which is granted additional protections under the Privacy Act and APPs, due to its significance and the potential harm that could result from misuse. Telehealth services are identified as a health service provider under the Privacy Act.

To comply with the Privacy Act and the APPs, telehealth service providers must handle all patient information in a manner that complies with their legal obligations. In particular, health information can only be collected by lawful and fair means, and generally only with the patient’s (express or implied) consent and where the information is reasonably necessary for providing a health service to that patient. Certain exemptions do apply to “health service providers” (including telehealth businesses), such as where the collection is necessary to provide a health service and is either authorised by law or it is collected in accordance with confidentiality rules established by competent health boards or medical bodies. Consent is also not required where information is collected or disclosed in order to prevent a serious threat to life, public health or safety. Health information can only be collected directly from the patient unless it is not reasonable or practical to do so.

Source.

 

Telehealth regulation

 

There are currently no laws or regulations specifically relating to telehealth in Australia. Existing laws and regulations relating to the provision healthcare apply to telehealth. However, various regulatory and industry bodies across the healthcare profession have released guidance notes on delivering services via telehealth.

For example, Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (“AHPRA”), the federal body responsible for regulation of healthcare professionals in Australia has published on its website a telehealth guidance for practitioners (“AHPRA Guidance”). 

The AHPRA Guidance states that all registered health practitioners can use telehealth as long as it is safe and clinically appropriate for the health service being provided and suitable for the patient.

Source.

Privacy and Data Protection

 

Australian privacy and surveillance laws are generally applicable to the provision of telehealth services in Australia.

At the Federal level, the core privacy legislation is the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (“Privacy Act”) and the Australian Privacy Principles (“APPs”). State and territory legislation broadly aligns with the Federal framework. The Privacy Act regulates the collection, use and disclosure of personal information, defined as information or an opinion about an identified individual, or an individual who is reasonably identifiable, whether the information or opinion is true or not and whether recorded in a material form or not. All personal information collected in the course of providing a health service, including information or an opinion about the health of an individual and their wishes about the future provision of health, is considered health information under the Privacy Act. Health information is sensitive information, which is granted additional protections under the Privacy Act and APPs, due to its significance and the potential harm that could result from misuse. Telehealth services are identified as a health service provider under the Privacy Act.

To comply with the Privacy Act and the APPs, telehealth service providers must handle all patient information in a manner that complies with their legal obligations. In particular, health information can only be collected by lawful and fair means, and generally only with the patient’s (express or implied) consent and where the information is reasonably necessary for providing a health service to that patient. Certain exemptions do apply to “health service providers” (including telehealth businesses), such as where the collection is necessary to provide a health service and is either authorised by law or it is collected in accordance with confidentiality rules established by competent health boards or medical bodies. Consent is also not required where information is collected or disclosed in order to prevent a serious threat to life, public health or safety. Health information can only be collected directly from the patient unless it is not reasonable or practical to do so.

Source.

 

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